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20 Reasons Why You Should Drink a Glass of Wine Every Day Slideshow

20 Reasons Why You Should Drink a Glass of Wine Every Day Slideshow


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20 Reasons Why You Should Drink a Glass of Wine Every Day

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But just a glass. We know that articles like these are tempting fodder for excuses to down a bottle with a friend under the guise of, “It’s healthy for me!” But we’re really only advocating a glass a day — that’s all.

Heavy drinking comes with a laundry list of terrifying side effects of its own, and likely counteracts all the good you’d otherwise do for your body with a smooth glass of red. And with alcoholism climbing rapidly in popularity in the United States, we should all be mindful to prevent such excess consumption now more than ever.

But honestly, this list is still great news. There’s just something so relaxing about sitting down with a glass of wine at dinner or winding down after a busy day with wine and reality TV. As it turns out, the benefits go far beyond simple relaxation.

The verdict on alcohol consumption as a whole is more messy and confusing, but health experts seem to agree on one thing: Wine in moderation is great for you. In study after study, we discover more perks that turn an indulgent glass of red wine into an elixir of health.

It Boosts Your Immune System

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It Could Improve Your Vision

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As you age, you’re at greater risk for blood vessel overgrowth in your eyes; this overgrowth often causes vision impairment. Cataracts, macular degeneration, and even blindness could occur. However, one study showed that mice exposed to resveratrol (the healthiest ingredient in wine) effectively combated blood-vessel-related damage.

It Could Prevent Liver Disease

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Again: only in moderation. An excess of any type of alcohol balloons your risk of liver damage and disease. However, promising research from the UC San Diego School of Medicine found that drinkers of wine had far lower risk of liver disease than drinkers of other substances. So if you’re going to drink something, your liver really prefers it be wine.

It Could Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

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One recent study confirmed a result found years ago in other studies regarding wine and insulin: Moderate drinkers have a dramatically decreased risk of developing diabetes later in life than non-drinkers. Of course, the result was exclusive to frequent drinkers of small amounts and did not extend to less frequent drinkers of large amounts of alcohol. So no, you can’t just save all those drinks for Friday night and expect the same benefit.

It Could Stall Dementia

It Improves Your Memory

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(Though it probably won’t help you remember anything while you’re drinking it.)

Resveratrol, the substance responsible for many of the benefits of red wine, has been shown to increase the number of brain connections made by wine drinkers to eventually improve memory. Just make sure your memory is good enough to recall why you should limit it to one glass — or risk the brain degeneration that could come with the excess!

It Increases Omega-3s

In a European study, researchers showed that wine drinkers exhibited higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids than any other group studied. Omega-3s are the “good fats” — the ones you want more of for their cancer-fighting, blood-pressure-lowering, health-boosting benefits. We recommend pairing your wine with a nice fillet of salmon for an extra dose of the nutrient.

It Lowers Your Cholesterol

It Makes Your Bones Stronger

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In one study, participants who drank one to two drinks per day had stronger, heftier bones than the group that abstained. The one caveat was that this effect only held up for the female population, and has not been witnessed yet in men. Sorry, guys!

It Prevents Cavities

It might turn your teeth blue, but (counterintuitively) it’s also helping keep them clean. Wine helps reduce the growth of harmful bacteria on your skin and your teeth, so having a glass with dinner could help bolster your defenses against bacteria growth that leads to cavities. It won’t replace a visit to the dentist, and you still have to brush your teeth — but it surely couldn’t hurt.

It Prevents Heart Disease

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Even the American Heart Association is on our side with this one — wine could help keep your heart healthier for longer. Red wine can prevent blood clotting that could steer your body dangerously towards a heart attack. Any type of alcohol could be helpful in this respect, but red wine does so on top of its other heart-healthy benefits, such as preventing coronary disease and stroke.

It Protects Against Sunburn

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Drinking in the sun is still a terrible idea — but if it’s just one glass of wine, you get a pass. Wine inhibits the reactive skin cells responsible for reacting when exposed to UV rays. Their reaction is what results in the painful burns.

It Reduces Risk of Stroke

It Regulates Blood Sugar

It Wards Off Depression

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We definitely don’t recommend you drown your woes in wine — but if you aren’t experiencing severe depression, drinking the stuff could help ward it off. One study associated drinking red wine with lowered rates of depression in participants.

Heavy drinking, on the other hand, is just as heavily correlated with an increase in depression — so just make sure you don’t cross the line into dangerous territory. Alcohol is a depressant, after all.

It’s Good for Your Gut

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Sherry Shares Wine's Health Benefits

March 19, 2004 -- Those who enjoy a glass of sherry as an aperitif or after-dinner drink now have a new reason to toast their good health. New research suggests that Spanish sherries share many of the same heart-healthy benefits associated with red wines.

Researchers say sherries are considered to fall somewhere in between the two major types of wine -- red and white -- and have been neglected in recent studies that looked at the potential cardiovascular health benefits of alcohol consumption and wines.

In the study, Spanish researchers tested four common types of sherries and found that they all produced significant decreases in cholesterol levels and increases in the proportion of "good" HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol in laboratory rats.

"This paper shows that in addition to typical red and white wines, sherries should be included in the list of wines with beneficial physiological effects following moderate consumption," writes researcher Felix Elorza of Labosur, a laboratory of food and agriculture, in Seville, Spain.

Wines produced in the Jerez region of Spain, known worldwide as sherries, are basically white wines that have been fortified and oxidized, which produces color changes.


Sherry Shares Wine's Health Benefits

March 19, 2004 -- Those who enjoy a glass of sherry as an aperitif or after-dinner drink now have a new reason to toast their good health. New research suggests that Spanish sherries share many of the same heart-healthy benefits associated with red wines.

Researchers say sherries are considered to fall somewhere in between the two major types of wine -- red and white -- and have been neglected in recent studies that looked at the potential cardiovascular health benefits of alcohol consumption and wines.

In the study, Spanish researchers tested four common types of sherries and found that they all produced significant decreases in cholesterol levels and increases in the proportion of "good" HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol in laboratory rats.

"This paper shows that in addition to typical red and white wines, sherries should be included in the list of wines with beneficial physiological effects following moderate consumption," writes researcher Felix Elorza of Labosur, a laboratory of food and agriculture, in Seville, Spain.

Wines produced in the Jerez region of Spain, known worldwide as sherries, are basically white wines that have been fortified and oxidized, which produces color changes.


Sherry Shares Wine's Health Benefits

March 19, 2004 -- Those who enjoy a glass of sherry as an aperitif or after-dinner drink now have a new reason to toast their good health. New research suggests that Spanish sherries share many of the same heart-healthy benefits associated with red wines.

Researchers say sherries are considered to fall somewhere in between the two major types of wine -- red and white -- and have been neglected in recent studies that looked at the potential cardiovascular health benefits of alcohol consumption and wines.

In the study, Spanish researchers tested four common types of sherries and found that they all produced significant decreases in cholesterol levels and increases in the proportion of "good" HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol in laboratory rats.

"This paper shows that in addition to typical red and white wines, sherries should be included in the list of wines with beneficial physiological effects following moderate consumption," writes researcher Felix Elorza of Labosur, a laboratory of food and agriculture, in Seville, Spain.

Wines produced in the Jerez region of Spain, known worldwide as sherries, are basically white wines that have been fortified and oxidized, which produces color changes.


Sherry Shares Wine's Health Benefits

March 19, 2004 -- Those who enjoy a glass of sherry as an aperitif or after-dinner drink now have a new reason to toast their good health. New research suggests that Spanish sherries share many of the same heart-healthy benefits associated with red wines.

Researchers say sherries are considered to fall somewhere in between the two major types of wine -- red and white -- and have been neglected in recent studies that looked at the potential cardiovascular health benefits of alcohol consumption and wines.

In the study, Spanish researchers tested four common types of sherries and found that they all produced significant decreases in cholesterol levels and increases in the proportion of "good" HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol in laboratory rats.

"This paper shows that in addition to typical red and white wines, sherries should be included in the list of wines with beneficial physiological effects following moderate consumption," writes researcher Felix Elorza of Labosur, a laboratory of food and agriculture, in Seville, Spain.

Wines produced in the Jerez region of Spain, known worldwide as sherries, are basically white wines that have been fortified and oxidized, which produces color changes.


Sherry Shares Wine's Health Benefits

March 19, 2004 -- Those who enjoy a glass of sherry as an aperitif or after-dinner drink now have a new reason to toast their good health. New research suggests that Spanish sherries share many of the same heart-healthy benefits associated with red wines.

Researchers say sherries are considered to fall somewhere in between the two major types of wine -- red and white -- and have been neglected in recent studies that looked at the potential cardiovascular health benefits of alcohol consumption and wines.

In the study, Spanish researchers tested four common types of sherries and found that they all produced significant decreases in cholesterol levels and increases in the proportion of "good" HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol in laboratory rats.

"This paper shows that in addition to typical red and white wines, sherries should be included in the list of wines with beneficial physiological effects following moderate consumption," writes researcher Felix Elorza of Labosur, a laboratory of food and agriculture, in Seville, Spain.

Wines produced in the Jerez region of Spain, known worldwide as sherries, are basically white wines that have been fortified and oxidized, which produces color changes.


Sherry Shares Wine's Health Benefits

March 19, 2004 -- Those who enjoy a glass of sherry as an aperitif or after-dinner drink now have a new reason to toast their good health. New research suggests that Spanish sherries share many of the same heart-healthy benefits associated with red wines.

Researchers say sherries are considered to fall somewhere in between the two major types of wine -- red and white -- and have been neglected in recent studies that looked at the potential cardiovascular health benefits of alcohol consumption and wines.

In the study, Spanish researchers tested four common types of sherries and found that they all produced significant decreases in cholesterol levels and increases in the proportion of "good" HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol in laboratory rats.

"This paper shows that in addition to typical red and white wines, sherries should be included in the list of wines with beneficial physiological effects following moderate consumption," writes researcher Felix Elorza of Labosur, a laboratory of food and agriculture, in Seville, Spain.

Wines produced in the Jerez region of Spain, known worldwide as sherries, are basically white wines that have been fortified and oxidized, which produces color changes.


Sherry Shares Wine's Health Benefits

March 19, 2004 -- Those who enjoy a glass of sherry as an aperitif or after-dinner drink now have a new reason to toast their good health. New research suggests that Spanish sherries share many of the same heart-healthy benefits associated with red wines.

Researchers say sherries are considered to fall somewhere in between the two major types of wine -- red and white -- and have been neglected in recent studies that looked at the potential cardiovascular health benefits of alcohol consumption and wines.

In the study, Spanish researchers tested four common types of sherries and found that they all produced significant decreases in cholesterol levels and increases in the proportion of "good" HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol in laboratory rats.

"This paper shows that in addition to typical red and white wines, sherries should be included in the list of wines with beneficial physiological effects following moderate consumption," writes researcher Felix Elorza of Labosur, a laboratory of food and agriculture, in Seville, Spain.

Wines produced in the Jerez region of Spain, known worldwide as sherries, are basically white wines that have been fortified and oxidized, which produces color changes.


Sherry Shares Wine's Health Benefits

March 19, 2004 -- Those who enjoy a glass of sherry as an aperitif or after-dinner drink now have a new reason to toast their good health. New research suggests that Spanish sherries share many of the same heart-healthy benefits associated with red wines.

Researchers say sherries are considered to fall somewhere in between the two major types of wine -- red and white -- and have been neglected in recent studies that looked at the potential cardiovascular health benefits of alcohol consumption and wines.

In the study, Spanish researchers tested four common types of sherries and found that they all produced significant decreases in cholesterol levels and increases in the proportion of "good" HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol in laboratory rats.

"This paper shows that in addition to typical red and white wines, sherries should be included in the list of wines with beneficial physiological effects following moderate consumption," writes researcher Felix Elorza of Labosur, a laboratory of food and agriculture, in Seville, Spain.

Wines produced in the Jerez region of Spain, known worldwide as sherries, are basically white wines that have been fortified and oxidized, which produces color changes.


Sherry Shares Wine's Health Benefits

March 19, 2004 -- Those who enjoy a glass of sherry as an aperitif or after-dinner drink now have a new reason to toast their good health. New research suggests that Spanish sherries share many of the same heart-healthy benefits associated with red wines.

Researchers say sherries are considered to fall somewhere in between the two major types of wine -- red and white -- and have been neglected in recent studies that looked at the potential cardiovascular health benefits of alcohol consumption and wines.

In the study, Spanish researchers tested four common types of sherries and found that they all produced significant decreases in cholesterol levels and increases in the proportion of "good" HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol in laboratory rats.

"This paper shows that in addition to typical red and white wines, sherries should be included in the list of wines with beneficial physiological effects following moderate consumption," writes researcher Felix Elorza of Labosur, a laboratory of food and agriculture, in Seville, Spain.

Wines produced in the Jerez region of Spain, known worldwide as sherries, are basically white wines that have been fortified and oxidized, which produces color changes.


Sherry Shares Wine's Health Benefits

March 19, 2004 -- Those who enjoy a glass of sherry as an aperitif or after-dinner drink now have a new reason to toast their good health. New research suggests that Spanish sherries share many of the same heart-healthy benefits associated with red wines.

Researchers say sherries are considered to fall somewhere in between the two major types of wine -- red and white -- and have been neglected in recent studies that looked at the potential cardiovascular health benefits of alcohol consumption and wines.

In the study, Spanish researchers tested four common types of sherries and found that they all produced significant decreases in cholesterol levels and increases in the proportion of "good" HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol in laboratory rats.

"This paper shows that in addition to typical red and white wines, sherries should be included in the list of wines with beneficial physiological effects following moderate consumption," writes researcher Felix Elorza of Labosur, a laboratory of food and agriculture, in Seville, Spain.

Wines produced in the Jerez region of Spain, known worldwide as sherries, are basically white wines that have been fortified and oxidized, which produces color changes.