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Best Thousand Island Dressing Recipes

Best Thousand Island Dressing Recipes


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Top Rated Thousand Island Dressing Recipes

This hot American sandwich is truly a classic recipe with corned beef, melted Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, and creamy Russian or Thousand Island dressing all on fresh rye bread. You can make this into a Rachel Sandwich by substituting the pastrami for the corned beef, and serve both of them at your next luncheon. ​

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Thousand Island Dressing

As with many recipes (if not most), a Thousand Island Dressing Recipe has many variations.

This salad dressing is a variation of Russian salad dressing (which often contains yogurt and more chili sauce or ketchup).

This delicious salad dressing is not only used on salads, but it is excellent as a vegetable dip.

Often people use it as a sandwich spread, as well.

Some people have told me the name of the dressing is because the tiny pieces of pickle (or pepper) makes it look like there are a thousand little islands in the dressing. I don't believe that is where the name came from.

From what I have read, a lady by the name of Sophia LaLonde invented it about 1910. Mrs. LaLonde lived in the Thousand Islands region of upstate New York. So I believe the salad dressing is named after that region.

There are two recipes for Thousand Island on this page. The first is as close to the original version as I know (Mrs. LaLonde's recipe).

The second is one that has been used at the restaurant for many years and is a little more like most recipes for this dressing today.

But neither recipe is "bright" orange, as you often see in grocery stores today.

Original Thousand Island Dressing

Preparation time:ꀠ minutes. Makes 1 quart

  • 3 eggs, hard boiled, peeled, cooled and chopped well
  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1/4 cup white vinegar
  • 1 pinch ground cloves
  • 1 quart mayonnaise
  • 3/4 cup sweet pickle relish
  • 1/2 cup chopped black olives
  • 1/2 cup diced red bell pepper
  • In a large bowl, whisk together (or use a spatula) the chopped eggs, Worcestershire, sugar, vinegar, cloves, mayonnaise, relish, olives and red pepper until well blended
  • Pour into a container, refrigerate and serve chilled

1000 Island Dressing Recipe # 2

Preparation time:ꀕ minutes. Makes approximately 40 servings (2 tablespoons each)

(For carb counters, each serving of 2 tablespoons is about 2 carbs)

  • 1 quart mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup water or milk
  • 1 tablespoon powdered sugar
  • 1/4 cup bottled chili sauce (or to taste)
  • 1/2 cup sweet pickles, finely chopped (or use pickle relish)

Enjoy your Thousand Island Dressing as a sandwich spread, a dip with veggies or on a salad or . as I was first introduced to it (many years ago), on a wedge of iceberg lettuce. (The “wedge” is back, of course). :-)

"The embarrassing thing is that the salad dressing is outgrossing my films."


Thousand Island dressing ingredients

First of all, what is Thousand Island dressing? It’s a salad dressing and condiment, sometimes used on a Reuben sandwich if you’re not using Russian dressing. Did you know that the Big Mac sauce is even a variation on this dressing? Thousand Island dressing ingredients include mayonnaise, ketchup, and spices. It typically includes finely chopped ingredients like pickles, onions, bell peppers, and so forth.

Where did the name Thousand Island come from? There’s some contention on exactly how it originated. But popular belief is that the dressing was a traditional sauce from the late 19th century in the Thousand Islands region, located along the upper St. Lawrence River between the United States and Canada.


Thousand Island Dressing Ingredients:

  • base: mayonnaise
  • aromatics: garlic, yellow onion
  • acids: white vinegar, lemon juice
  • condiments: ketchup, sugar, kosher salt, sweet pickle relish
  • spice: sweet paprika


How To Make Classic Thousand Island Dressing

Fact: Homemade salad dressings are better. They are fresh, lively, and easy to customize. This is especially true when it comes to the oft-maligned classic, Thousand Island dressing — yes, I mean that pink dressing on the salad bar in the giant squeeze bottle.

The homemade version of this dressing’s got a few neat tricks up its sleeve — including a hard-boiled egg used as a thickener. The alchemy transforms the dressing into a tamer of the bitterest of greens it’s also a frequent partner for crisp iceberg lettuce, and the true identity behind the Big Mac’s special sauce.

What Is Thousand Island Dressing?

Thousand Island dressing is made with mayonnaise and ketchup (or some other sweetened tomato condiment), thickened with a hard-boiled egg pressed through a sieve, and enlivened with vinegar and sweet pickle relish.

Thickening Your Dressing with a Hard-Cooked egg

Pushing a hard-cooked egg through a fine-mesh sieve isn’t something you come across often in a recipe nowadays, but it wasn’t uncommon as a thickener when Thousand Island dressing was invented.

As a technique, very finely mashing, sieving, or grating a hard-boiled egg works very well, adding not just taste, but also texture and depth not usually associated with salad dressing. It’s the backbone, like mustard in a vinaigrette.

It makes sense if you think about it: Tuna fish salad, a mid-century favorite, becomes creamy with some well-mashed or sieved egg yolks homespun recipes from the same era showcase egg yolks to thicken gravies. Eggs moved from elegant to everyday in about 50 years and by the 1970s, even deviled eggs fell out of favor and were considered dated and old. This is when Thousand Island recipes began to change and suffer.

The History of an American Dressing

Thousand Island dressing has an overabundance of origin stories. It was invented in the resorts in the Thousand Island area of the most northern reaches of New York state and southern Ontario, Canada, just after the turn of the 20th century.

Russian dressing, Thousand Island dressing’s horseradish- and paprika-flecked cousin, has origins that are just as murky. It seems this dressing may have included caviar as an ingredient — hence the Russian moniker. As we know it, it was invented in the resorts of New Hampshire around the same time Thousand Island debuted. Both were thought of as upscale food, served with fresh greens, reserved for those privileged to “summer” away from the heat and masses of urban areas. Oddly, over time, Russian dressing was adopted by New York’s urban delis while the Thousand Island graced fine steakhouses.

Despite its origin as a sauce for the fanciest, Thousand Island dressing devolved through the 1970s into mass-market production, becoming the oft-maligned dressing that sits across from the cottage cheese in large squeeze bottles at salad bars and atop a Big Mac. Yup, it’s pretty much the special sauce!

Demoted by years of packaged preservatives and pommeled with artificial colors and flavors, Thousand Island dressing is a revelation when you make it yourself.


Thousand Island Dressing

This thick, satisfying condiment has long been a favorite of salad lovers the world over. This is our interpretation of the Waldorf-Astoria’s recipe, which we love spooned over a crisp, cool wedge of iceberg lettuce or charcoal-grilled hamburgers.

Thousand Island Dressing

This homemade thousand island couldn't be easier.

Using mostly ingredients anybody on WW has in their home, this recipe comes together in a snap. Simply mix all the ingredients in a large bowl. I personally think this recipe is better the next day, but you can serve this immediately.

Here are answers to common questions I get about the ingredients:

  • Do I use sugar free ketchup? No. I use Heinz. Feel free to use what you like.
  • What Greek yogurt do I use? Fage, always.
  • I'm allergic to almond milk or I can't find cashew milk. Can I substitute with a different milk? Sure. I'm not going to cyber bully you or be mad if you substitute.
  • Where do you find no sugar relish? I buy the store brand one. If you can't find sugar free relish, chop up a bunch of pickles. I do it all the time. It's slightly not the same, but very tasty.
  • How much does this make? This makes a lot. 2 1/4 cups. You can cut this in half, but 13 is not divisible by 2. I'm saying this because the WW app will not acknowledge 7.5 servings. Don't panic if you cut it in half and the app defaults to one point.
  • How long does this last? I'm not a food safety expert. I keep it for about a week. I've known people who keep it for as long as the Greek yogurt is good. Then again, I've seen some strange things on the internet. Use your judgment and give it a sniff test.
  • What can I make with this besides salad? Well funny you should ask.
  • Do I use sugar free ketchup? No. I use Heinz. Feel free to use what you like.
  • What Greek yogurt do I use? Fage, always.
  • I'm allergic to almond milk or I can't find cashew milk. Can I substitute with a different milk? Sure. I'm not going to cyber bully you or be mad if you substitute.
  • Where do you find no sugar relish? I buy the store brand one. If you can't find sugar free relish, chop up a bunch of pickles. I do it all the time. It's slightly not the same, but very tasty.
  • How much does this make? This makes a lot. 2 1/4 cups. You can cut this in half, but 13 is not divisible by 2. I'm saying this because the WW app will not acknowledge 7.5 servings. Don't panic if you cut it in half and the app defaults to one point.
  • How long does this healthy thousand island dressing last? I'm not a food safety expert. I keep it for about a week. I've known people who keep it for as long as the Greek yogurt is good. Then again, I've seen some strange things on the internet. Use your judgment and give it a sniff test.
  • What can I make with this besides salad? Well funny you should ask.

Homemade Thousand Island Dressing

Both a salad dressing and a condiment, Thousand Island dressing is—to put it bluntly— mayonnaise dressed up with whatever's around. A sort of uber-condiment, it has many variations. Besides mayonnaise, it may include onions, sweet pickle relish, ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, hard-boiled egg, bell peppers, parsley, green olives, pimento, garlic chives, and even nuts. It also boasts a colorful name and history, complete with competing origin stories dating back to the late 1800s. While the specifics may never be known for sure, it seems clear that Thousand Island hails from the Upper Midwest region of the United States.

It has come a long way from its humble origin. Thousand Island dressing now sits atop three of the most famous sandwiches in the world: the Reuben, Big Mac, and the In-N-Out burger. It is also, of course, a popular choice for salads.

This version here has been pared down to the basic flavors. Feel free to dress it up with any of the ingredients above. Bear in mind that ingredients like fresh chopped onions, peppers, parsley and so on will shorten the shelf life of the dressing. If you want to make a batch to keep on hand, and you aren't sure what you're going to use it for, it's better to go for a longer shelf life. That way you won't have any of this precious stuff go to waste.

If, on the other hand, you want more texture in your dressing, and you don't mind a shorter shelf-life, then chopped onions, sweet pickle relish, and pimentos make great additions to the recipe below. The onions add a bit of crunch and the relish and pimentos add some depth. For a spicy kick, try adding a dash of crushed red chili pepper.

Try giving your Thousand Island some international flair. For a fusion feeling, add a bit of Sriracha, miso, hoisin, wasabi, or garam masala. Seriously, put anything you want in your homemade Thousand Island. It's a mayo meta-condiment. Improvise, have fun, and use whatever is around. Maybe someday your version will make it onto a famous sandwich with a catchy name.


Gallery

  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • ½ cup ketchup
  • 2 tablespoons dill pickle relish
  • 2 teaspoons prepared horseradish
  • 1 teaspoon granulated garlic
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seed
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon celery seed
  • 2 hard-cooked eggs, chopped

Stir mayonnaise, ketchup, relish, horseradish, garlic, chili powder, mustard seed, black pepper, and celery seed together in a bowl. Fold chopped eggs into dressing. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate until flavors blend, at least 3 hours.


Best Thousand Island Dressing Recipes - Recipes

Aside from boosting your veggie and nutrient intake, salads are a great way to slim down. They help to moderate food intake by increasing satiety which reduces the likelihood of overeating. Plus, they're extremely versatile you can dress them up or dress them down, and they're incredibly delicious with the right combinations of foods. But top off your salad with the wrong dressing and you could be ingesting more calories and fat than if you had downed an ice cream sundae. Here's a fantastic no added sugar version of Thousand Island Dressing that won't leave you marooned on the island of big fat fatties.

Serves: 48
Serving Size: 1 tablespoon
Carbs Per Serving: 1.4 g
Prep Time:<25 minutes

Skill Level: Easy

Most burgers' secret sauces are simply Thousand Island Dressing. Thousand Island dressing has so many uses. I love it on Ruben Sandwiches, which I have such a craving for. For those of you living under a rock a Ruben is pastrami or corned beef, sauerkraut on grilled rye with swiss cheese and of course, thousand island dressing. But, the first thing that popped into my head is all the sugar that is in 1000 Island Dressing over 3 times as much as soda pop. Wow! Here is a really easy 1000 Island Dressing Recipe and has almost no sugar and is diabetic friendly. Check it out!

Ingredients:
1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup Trinity Hill Farms No Added Sugar Ketchup
1 cup sugar free sweet pickle relish (see recipe here)
1 pinch salt
1 pinch ground black pepper

In a small bowl, mix together the mayonnaise, sugar free ketchup, sugar free relish, salt and pepper until thoroughly combined, and serve.


THOUSAND ISLAND DRESSING

Thousand island dressing is so much better than the store bought and so easy to make at home.

We love this dressing and put it on everything. It is great as a sandwich spread and good on hamburgers, reuben sandwiches, regular salads and pasta salads. It will keep in the refrigerator for at least a week or longer. You can double the recipe or cut it in half if you just want to try it. My favorite way to have this is on my favorite salad of just spinach, chopped tomatoes, onions, craisins or raisins and a chopped boiled egg. You can put a chopped boiled egg in the dressing if you like but I like my egg on my salad. You might also like our recipe for homemade buttermilk ranch dressing or honey mustard dressing. I keep this dressing in my fridge because we use it on so many foods.


Watch the video: Dieses Salatdressing Rezept überzeugt sogar Salathasser:. Pommes Män