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Have Some Dim Sum at Home

Have Some Dim Sum at Home


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The Chinese New Year celebration, also known as the Spring Festival, lasts two weeks every year. Food is a prominent part of the celebration, and dim sum is one popular way of celebrating. Want to try making your own dim sum at home? Then you've come to the right place.

Dim sum, if you haven't had it before, is a Cantonese style of cooking and serving food that involves many bite-sized dishes served on small plates or in stackable steamer baskets made of metal or bamboo. Depending on your perspective and epicurean experience, you might call it "Chinese tapas," or you might call tapas "Spanish dim sum." Either way, there are a few dim sum dishes that are truly iconic.

Har Gow

Har gow (also known as xiao jiao), are shrimp dumplings in crystal wrappers that are chewy and tasty with a hint of garlic and pork. Making these at home is easier than you think. (Photo courtesy of M.Y. China)

Siu Mai

Siu mai are open-faced dumplings filled with a mixture of shrimp and pork and flavored with oyster sauce, ginger, and sesame oil. Har gow and siu mai go together like a hot pot of tea, and well, dim sum. (Photo courtesy of Farina Kingsley)

Crab and Pork Soup Dumplings

Xiao long bao, known as "soup dumplings," in English, are filled with gelatin cubes that melt into the meat filling as they steam, resulting in a rich, savory broth bursting onto one's palate after biting into the thin, delicate skin that forms the outside wrapper. (Photo courtesy of Buddakan NYC)

But dim sum isn't just for Chinese New Year. Every weekend for lunch, Chinese families flock to dim sum restaurants, often waiting in line to have their number called over a PA system, and sharing in a tradition that's as timeless as pouring tea for one's elders.

Will Budiaman is the Recipe Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @WillBudiaman.


Your Go-To Guide to All Types of Dim Sum

Enjoying dim sum is as much as the dining experience as it is about the food itself. In addition to amazing flavors, you’ll also get to engage with friends and family, sip tea, and linger over a great meal. Whether you’re interested in heading to the nearest dim sum restaurant to enjoy your favorite flavors, or you want to create some dishes of your own at home, there are many excellent recipes to pick from and tastes to savor.

Here at Fly By Jing, we want to make it as smooth and easy as possible to get the dim sum experience you and your loved ones are looking for. That’s why we offer the best spices and oils to use in your dim sum dishes, and why we’re sharing this go-to guide for ordering, making, and enjoying dim sum.


CHINESE DINING: Fix some dim sum for dinner

But an even looser translation that makes more sense to me is "pointing to your heart's delight," because that's what people do. In an authentic Chinese tea house, noodle house or dim sum parlor, you don't order dim sum you just point to (as if dotting with a finger) the tasty item you wish to sample from the cart as it is rolled about among the tables.

In China, dim sum is a unique food-related event, as well as the food served at that event. Items include dainty, hand-formed, steamed, baked or deep-fried wrappers, dumplings and buns filled with vegetables, ground beef, pork, shrimp or sweet red bean paste. Other small, stir-fried, salty or sweet dishes such as marinated meats, noodles and "puddings" are also available. All such snacking foods, eaten in no particular order, are part of Yum Cha (tea drinking) and are traditionally served at room temperature in the afternoon.

This dim sum dish is best prepared in a traditional wok over high heat. Once all preparation is done, the actual cooking time is short.

2 teaspoons light soy sauce

1 pound fresh rice noodles (or any flat noodle cooked al dente)

1/2- to 3/4-pound flank steak

1 pound broccoli, stems peeled, florets broken into pieces

1 stalk green onion, cut in 1-1/2-inch pieces

1 slice fresh ginger (size of a quarter), crushed

4 to 5 tablespoons cooking oil

3 tablespoons oyster sauce (now found in supermarkets)

2 teaspoons light soy sauce

For the marinade: Combine cornstarch, dry sherry and light soy sauce.

For the dim sum: Slice the flank steak across the grain in thin strips about 1/8-inch thick. (It slices easier when cold.)

Marinate the meat for 1/2 hour.

Stir-fry the broccoli pieces in 1 tablespoon oil for 3 to 4 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons water the last 2 minutes and cover to steam.

Add 1 tablespoon oil to the wok and brown the garlic and ginger.

Stir-fry the beef, drizzle 1 tablespoon oyster sauce on top and set aside on a warm platter.

Add 2 tablespoons oil and stir-fry the fresh rice noodles (or the al dente noodles), turning and adding a little water, if necessary, to make the rice noodles soften. It takes about 3 to 4 minutes, but you may have to add more water or oil to keep up a steady steam to help soften the rice noodles.

Add back the meat, broccoli and green onion to the hot wok.

Stir in the rest of the oyster sauce, sesame oil and soy sauce.

- "Dim Sum," Rhoda Fong Yee, 1977

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  • Preparation: 15 min
  • Cook: 20 min
  • Clean up: 10 min

Directions

Preparing the batter

  • In a bowl, mix the rice flour, wheat starch, salt, vegetable oil and water. Stir until there are no lumps.

Add the fillings

Pour the batter into an 8”x 8” square pan and evenly distribute the batter to form a thin layer.

Scatter the dried shrimps, scallions, prawns on top of the batter.

You can choose any ingredient of your liking as the filling.

Lo Bak Go (Crispy Radish Cake)

Steam

Place the square pan in the steamer. Cover and steam for 2 minutes or until the rice sheet becomes translucent.

Remove from the steamer. Let cool for half a minute, then push the noodle sheet with the dough scraper to roll it up.

Roll 30 seconds after it comes out of the steamer so that it rolls easily and doesn’t stick to the pan or spatula.


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Nutrition Information:

Yield:

Serving Size:

This data was provided and calculated by Nutritionix on 3/19/2019


Have Some Dim Sum

The area’s best dim sum restaurant isn’t in Chinatown, it isn’t a gigantic palace near Eden Center, it’s actually tucked away on a side street in Annandale. A&J Restaurant is a small, cash only (yes, seriously, bring cash!) Taiwanese-style restaurant.

When you walk in, you may be given a table for your party or you may be asked to share one of the larger circular tables in the middle. Do it, don’t worry, it only seems awkward to share, but it gives you a great chance to see what everyone else is eating. The efficient servers will bring over your setup (plate, chopsticks, napkin), a pot of tea, and a menu. There are English and Chinese menus available. The descriptions on the menu are pretty accurate and you simply circle what you’d like with the provided pencil. There are no dim sum carts inside this small space. Within minutes, food starts to appear as it’s prepared. There’s no particular order for delivery, you just eat as it comes.

My fave dish: Zha Jiang Mian with wide noodles
“Noodles with ground pork and bean paste sauce”

Now, to the good part, the food! The first page of the menu lists many types of noodle soups and dishes. I’ve had many since I tend to go there once or twice a week lately. My favorites are the Spicy Beef Noodle Soup (Szechuan Style) and the Noodle with Ground Pork, Bean Sprouts, and Shredded Cucumber. Runners up are the Spicy Wonton with Hot Red Sauce and the Noodles in Hot Spicy Sesame Sauce and Topped w/Peanut Powder. First, the noodles are made in house and you get to select wide or thin. Choose the wide noodles which will be prepared perfectly, with just a little chew and left very, very long so that you get to test your chopstick/ soup spoon slurping skills.

  • Wontons in spicy chili oil
  • Just what I needed to help me get over a cold. Spicy, salty, and full of noodles and big chunks of beef.

The prices are fantastic and I love variety, so I usually order a couple items for about $20 and have plenty to take home for a full second meal. Most all reheat well, so don’t be afraid to order something a little extra

The next page has more of the traditional dim sum dishes like pan fried or steamed dumplings, scallion pancakes, and a variety of meat and vegetarian options. I find some of these offerings a little greasy, such as the pan-fried pork dumplings (potstickers). It seems most people order them, but I’m not sure if it’s just because they are a recognizable menu item for most, or if I just had them on an off day. My favorite on this page is the steamed pork dumplings. They’re delivered in quantities of four in a small steamer basket topped with fresh slivers of ginger. Mix up a little soy and vinegar from the bottles on the table and dig in.

  • The fresh ginger is what makes these juicy dumplings different from the rest.
  • Not my favorite, but they’re popular among the diners

The back page of the menu has mostly smaller, vegetarian dishes, drinks, and a couple sweets. The one thing I’ve ordered EVERY SINGLE visit is the cucumber salad in hot garlic sauce. These cool cucumbers served with spicy oil and sliced garlic almost always arrive first and are great to nibble on while waiting. There is a small separate brunch menu on Saturdays and Sundays that has soy milk, sticky rice, a couple egg dishes, and a jumbo breadstick

Cucumbers are spicy and cool all at the same time


DELIGHTS OF DIM SUM, AT HOME

THERE was a time when dim sum, the traditional food of the Chinese teahouse, was virtually unknown outside of southern China. There were teahouses in the various Chinatowns of America, but they were frequented mostly by the immigrant Chinese, most of them Cantonese, for whom dim sum was a reminder of home.

But that is no longer the case. These days dim sum, in all of its textures, tastes and forms - half-moons of pastry, tiny steamed baskets of dough, translucent squares of cakes made from water chestnuts, triangles of fresh bean curd, pancakes studded with scallions, tiny pillows filled with shrimp, mounds of rice wrapped in lotus or bamboo leaves, dumplings in the shape of corkscrews, horns, rolls, cylinders, thick rice porridges, balls of meat dotted with pearls of rice, cakes and custard tarts - enjoys a much broader appeal.

Today everybody eats the little foods that the Chinese have been eating since the 10th century in the teahouses of the Sung Dynasty. For many Americans, dim sum has become a Sunday morning institution, often replacing the usual weekend brunch. Dim sum is breakfast, it is brunch or lunch, whatever you wish to make it. It is important only that you enjoy it, because the words 'ɽim sum'' literally mean 'ɺ point on the heart'' or 'ɺ dot on the heart.'' Its gastronomic interpretation has come to be 'ɺ delight of the heart'' or 'ɺ touch of the heart's delight,'' which describe dim sum perfectly.

Among these '⟞lights'' are the shrimp-filled crescents called har gau, the little dough baskets known as siu mai, the baked or steamed buns called char siu bau the scallion pancakes that the Cantonese have borrowed from Shanghai, the thick rice soups called jooks or congees, and the tiny and delicate spring rolls, which the Cantonese call chun guen. And they are most appropriately eaten with jasmine tea, or with the green tea called Dragon Well, with the black Bo Lei tea or the strong, unfermented and slightly bitter Shou Mae tea.

But just as dim sum was for years a food not widely known, so its preparation has been regarded as somewhat mysterious. These little morsels are delicious, people will say, but are impossible to make at home rather, they are a food to enjoy in restaurants only.

This is simply not so. Dim sum can be made and made well, with style and with the fine and subtle tastes they have in the teahouses. Does making them take some time? Yes, of course. Is the result worth the effort? Absolutely, because not only do they taste wonderful, but many of them are sculptures and to shape and form them is an exercise that can be quite rewarding. What's more, many dim sum can be prepared ahead and frozen for later use either as hors d'oeuvres or as first courses in multicourse meals.

The primary tools of dim sum are the wok and the steamer. Some dim sum are pan-fried in skillets some are deep-fried, usually in peanut oil, in woks some are steamed. The wok, as close to an all-purpose cooking utensil as exists, is ideal for the latter two processes. As a deep-fat fryer it is excellent because the items being cooked can be separated and turned with ease. As a steaming tool, used with bamboo or metal steamers, it is unbeatable.

To use the wok in the steaming process, first place 4 to 5 cups of water in the wok and bring it to a boil. Put the steamers in the wok so they sit evenly above, but not touching, the water. Depending upon the number and size of the dim sum to be steamed, you will be able to stack as many as three steamers, with a cover over the top one, and the contents of all three will cook beautifully. Most steamed dim sum steam thoroughly in seven to 12 minutes. Steamed rice requires 25 to 35 minutes. Cakes require from one to one and a half hours. Boiling water should be kept on hand at all times during the steaming process to replenish the supply in the wok.

Chinese-style steaming with wok and steamer is almost a life-giving process. Doughs become soft, light and firm breads, dumplings and buns when subjected to steam's wet and penetrating heat. Food that is dried becomes moist that which is shrunken expands. Steaming preserves flavor and bestows, particulary upon doughs, a glistening coat. It is an artful technique as well, because foods can be placed in pleasing arrangements in steamers and, once cooked, they can be served without being disturbed. Steaming requires virtually no oil, except that used to coat the bamboo reeds at the bottom of the steamers to prevent sticking. And if a bamboo or lettuce leaf is used as a liner then all oil can be eliminated.

Doughs are of great importance in dim sum. Different doughs react differently to steam. Some become silky and translucent, others become white and opaque. Even some of the fillings, though prepared from identical ingredients, seem to taste differently in different dumplings, which is an interesting aspect of the alchemy of food.

With the recipes that follow I have tried to select as broad a spectrum as possible to illustrate the many traditional aspects of dim sum, the frying, the steaming, the dough-making, the filling. There are literally hundreds of different sorts of dim sum, a number defined only by the limits the individual cook sets. Jing Char Siu Bau (Steamed Pork Buns)

This is the dim sum that I remember eating the first time my brother took me to a teahouse. Among the Cantonese, if you know you are going to a teahouse, then you know you must have jing char siu bau. The filling may be prepared a day ahead of the dough. 1/2 cup onion, diced into 1/4-inch pieces 3/4 cup roast pork, cut into 1/2-inch thinly sliced pieces (see recipe) 1 tablespoon liquefied pork fat or peanut oil 1 1/2 teaspoons white wine. Combine in bowl: 1 tablespoon oyster sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons dark soy sauce 2 teaspoons ketchup 2 1/4 teaspoons sugar Pinch of white pepper 2 1/4 teaspoons cornstarch 2 1/2 ounces chicken broth 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil 1 steamed bun dough recipe (see recipe). To make filling:

1. Heat wok for 30 to 40 seconds. Add pork fat or peanut oil and heat until white smoke rises. Add onions and cook over low heat, turning occasionally, until onions turn light brown.

2. Add the roast pork, raise heat, and stir-fry to combine the pork with the onions. Add white wine and mix well.

3. Lower heat and add sauce mixture from bowl. Stir until entire mixture thickens and turns brown.

4. Add sesame oil and mix well.

5. Remove pork mixture from the wok, and transfer to a shallow dish. Allow mixture to cool to room temperature, then refrigerate, uncovered, for 4 hours. To prepare buns:

See steps in pictures on top of this page. Yield: 16 buns. NOTES: Use only 1 tablespoon of filling in the beginning until you have learned to work well with the dough otherwise, you will have trouble sealing the bun. When you feel comfortable working with the dough, increase the amount of filling to 2 tablespoons. These may be frozen after cooking and will keep two to three months. To reheat, defrost thoroughly, and steam for 8 to 10 minutes. Char Siu (Roast pork) 4 1/2 pounds lean pork butt In a bowl combine and mix well: 3 tablespoons dark soy sauce 3 tablespons light soy sauce 3 tablespoons honey 1/2 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons oyster sauce 2 tablespoons blended whisky 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce 1/8 teaspoon white pepper 1/2 cake wet preserved bean curd 1 teaspoon five-spice powder.

1. Cut pork into strips 1-inch thick. Using a small knife, pierce the meat repeatedly at 1/2-inch intervals to help tenderize it.

2. Line a roasting pan with foil. Place the strips of meat in a single layer at the bottom of the roasting pan.

3. Pour the remaining ingredients from the bowl over the meat, and allow to marinate for 4 hours or overnight.

4. Preheat the oven to broil. Place the roasting pan inside, and roast for 30 to 50 minutes. To test, remove one strip of pork after 30 minutes, and slice it to see if it is cooked through. During the cooking period, meat should be basted five or six times and turned four times. If the sauce dries out, add water to the pan.

5. When the meat is cooked, allow it to cool, then refrigerate it until you are ready to use it. NOTES: Wet preserved bean curd comes in both cans and jars. The canned bean curds are larger than those that come in jars. If you use the canned curds, only half a cake is required for this recipe if you use the curds in jars, use two small cakes.

Char Siu can be made ahead. It can be refrigerated for four to five days, and it can be frozen for one month. Allow it to defrost before using. Steamed Bun Dough 2 1/2 cups bleached enriched flour 3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 cup sugar 3 ounces milk 1 1/2 ounces water 2 tablespoon lard.

1. Mix flour, baking powder and sugar together on work surface then make a well in the middle.

2. Add milk gradually and with fingers combine it with flour mixure.

3. After milk has been absorbed, add water and with fingers continue to work the dough.

4. Add lard, and, again with fingers, continue to work dough.

5. Using a dough scraper, gather the dough with one hand and begin kneading with the other hand.

6. Knead for 12 to 15 minutes. If the dough is dry, add 1 teaspoon of water at a time, and continue to knead until dough becomes elastic. If the dough is wet, sprinkle a bit of flour on the work surface and on your hands and continue working.

7. When dough is elastic, cover with moderately damp cloth, and allow dough to rest for about 1 hour. NOTE: Gold Medal All-Purpose Enriched Bleached Flour is the best American flour for this recipe. Bleached flour must be used to insure a snowy white color. This dough must be used within one to two hours of the time it has been made. It cannot be frozen. Lop Cheung Guen (Steamed sausage buns) 8 cured Chinese pork sausages (lop cheung) 3 tablespoons oyster sauce 3 tablespoons dark soy sauce 1 tablespoon sesame oil 1 steamed bun dough recipe (see recipe).

1. Cut sausages in half, lengthwise and on the diagonal.

2. In a shallow dish, combine the oyster sauce, soy sauce and sesame oil. Add the sausage lengths and marinate for 30 minutes.

3. Roll bun dough in cylindrical piece 16 inches long. Cut into 16 1-inch pieces. Work with one piece at a time, covering the remaining pieces with a damp cloth to keep them moist.

4. Roll pieces into sausage shapes 12 inches in length.

5. Hold the sausage piece by its thinly cut end together with one end of long piece of dough. Press, then wrap the dough around the sausage.

6. Place sausage rolls on pieces of wax paper, 3 1/2 by 2 inches. Place in steamer 1 inch apart to allow for expansion.

7. Steam 15 to 20 minutes serve immediately. Yield: 16 buns. NOTE: These sausage buns can be frozen after cooking and will keep two to three months. To reheat, defrost thoroughly and steam for 8 to 10 minutes Har Gau (Shrimp dumplings) 2 1/2 tablespoons fresh pork fat, either bought packaged or trimmed from a fresh ham or from pork chops 3/4 pound shrimp, shelled, deveined, washed, dried and diced 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar 1/2 egg white, beaten 1 1/2 tablespoons tapioca flour 2 teaspoons oyster sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil Pinch of white pepper 1/3 cup water chestnuts, diced 1/3 cup white portion of scallions, finely chopped 1/4 cup bamboo shoots, diced 1 wheat starch-tapioca flour dough recipe.

1. Drop pork fat into 1 1/2 cups boiling water, and allow to boil until it cooks fully and becomes translucent. Remove from water, place in bowl, run cold water over it, let stand for several minutes, remove from water, dry with paper towel, and dice.

2. Place shrimp in bowl of electric mixer. Start mixer and add, mixing thoroughly between each addition, the salt, sugar, egg white, tapioca flour, oyster sauce, sesame oil and white pepper.

3. Add cooked pork fat, water chestnuts, scallions and bamboo shoots. Combine evenly and thoroughly.

4. Remove the mixure from the mixing bowl, and place it in a shallow bowl or dish and refrigerate for four hours or put in freezer for 25 minutes.

5. Using wheat starch-tapioca flour dough skins, from the dumplings: place 1/2 teaspoon of shrimp filling into center of each skin, then fold the skin in half, forming a crescent or half-moon shape.

6. Hold the dumpling securely in your left hand, then begin to form the pleats with fingers of your right hand. Continue to form small pleats until dumpling is completely closed.

7. Press the top edge of the dumpling between your thumb and index finger to seal it tightly. Tap the sealed edge lightly with your knuckles to give the dumpling its final shape.

8. Steam for 5 to 7 minutes serve immediately. Yield: 70 dumplings. NOTE: Har Gau can be frozen for future use. They keep for at least three months when piled neatly and wrapped in a double layer of plastic wrap and then in foil. To reheat, defrost, then steam for 3 to 5 minutes. Wheat Starch-Tapioca Flour Dough 2 cups wheat starch 1 cup tapioca flour 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 3/4 cups boiling water 3 tablespoons lard 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil. To prepare dough:

1. In the bowl of an electric mixer, place the wheat starch, tapioca flour and salt. Start the mixer, and as the bowl and dough hook rotate, add boiling water. (If electric mixer is unavailable, hand mix in same order, pouring boiling water with one hand while mixing with a wooden spoon with the other hand.)

2. Add the lard and the sesame oil, and mix together thoroughly. (You may have to assist mixing process with rubber spatula.) If dough is too dry, add 1 teaspoon of water.

3. Continue mixing until a ball of dough forms. Remove from bowl, knead a few times, divide into four equal pieces, and place each ball in a plastic bag to retain moisture until ready to use. To form skin:

1. Before working with dough, oil the work surface. Soak a paper towel in oil and repeatedly rub a cleaver across folded towel so that cleaver blade is slightly oiled.

2. Roll pieces of dough into sausage-shaped lenghts about 12 inches long and 1 inch in diameter. Cut a 1/2-inch piece from the length. Roll into a small ball, then press down with the palm of your hand.

3. Press flat with the broad side of the cleaver to create a round skin 2 1/4 inches in diameter. NOTES: Dough can be set aside for a few hours or overnight in cold weather. It must remain at room temperature it cannot be refrigerated or frozen.

If your electric mixer does not have a dough hook, you must mix the dough by hand. You cannot use a hand mixer with beaters. Chung Yau Bang (Scallion pancakes) 1 cup vegetable shortening (Crisco preferred) 3 cups scallions, ends discarded, washed, dried and chopped fine 1 3/4 teaspoons salt 1 3/4 teaspoons sugar 3 cups flour (Pillsbury's Best All-Purpose Enriched Bleached Flour preferred) 8 ounces hot water (plus another 1/2 ounce in reserve, if needed) 8 tablespoons peanut oil, for frying. To prepare filling:

In a bowl combine shortening, scallions, salt and sugar, and mix thoroughly into a paste. Reserve in refrigerator. To prepare dough:

1. Mound flour onto work surface. Make a well and pour hot water in with one hand, using fingers of the other hand to mix. When all the water has been poured, knead flour and water into dough. (If dough is too dry, add the extra 1/2 ounce of water.)

2. Using a scraper, pick up the dough, and continue to knead for 5 to 7 minutes, until it is smooth and elastic. Cover the dough with a damp cloth, and allow it to rest for at least 30 minutes. To prepare pancakes:

1. Divide the dough into four equal pieces. To prevent sticking as you roll out the dough, flour the work surface and rolling pin frequently. Roll each piece into a 12-inch-long roll 1 inch in diameter.

2. From the 12-inch roll, cut off a piece 2 1/2 inches long. With rolling pin, roll it out to a piece measuring 10 by 4 inches with rounded edges.

3. Spread 1 1/2 tablespoons of filling along the center of dough.

4. Fold both sides so they meet over the filling. Then flatten gently.

5. Fold in half lengthwise and press again.

6. Pick up the dough by the ends and gently stretch it, hitting it gently on the work surface at the same time.

7. Placing the folded edge outward, bringing the left end to the middle, creating a circle. Bring the right end around as far as possible to the left. Slip end between folds of dough and press gently. Press gently again so that the dough becomes a solid pancake. Repeat steps 2 through 7 until all the dough is used.

8. Fry pancakes in the peanut oil in heavy skillet, preferably cast iron, until golden brown on both sides. Remove, drain, and serve immediately.

Yield: 18 to 20 pancakes. NOTE: Both the dough and filling can be made a day ahead of time and refrigerated. Filling can be frozen and stored for one to two months. Cooked scallion pancakes can be frozen for one to two months. To reheat, pan-fry or reheat in 350-degree oven until warmed through. Yung Hai Kim (Stuffed crab claws) 1 basic shrimp filling recipe (see recipe) 12 to 14 crab claws (medium hard-shelled) 4 tablespoons plus 3/4 cup tapioca flour for dusting 5 cups peanut oil.

1. Prepare basic shrimp filling, and make sure it is completely chilled.

2. Steam the crab claws for 10 to 12 minutes and set aside.

3. Sprinkle the surfaces of two cookie sheets or baking pans with the 4 tablespoons of tapioca flour, covering completely. In a shallow dish, place 3/4 cup of tapioca flour.

4. Take a handful of filling and, with an opening-closing motion of the hand, smooth the filling into a ball. Then make a fist, and remove the excess filling as it comes through hand on the thumb side. Each ball should be about 2 inches in diameter. Place the balls on a floured cookie sheet or pan.

5. Press crab claw, meat side down, into the center of each ball of filling. Coat hands with tapioca flour from bowl lift crab claw and filling from sheet with both hands. Pack filling gently around claw, dusting with tapioca flour as you do so. Gently pack filling against claw with one hand, turning it with the other. Seal the filling around the claw with the little finger. Continue this until a smooth, croquette-shaped covering is achieved. Place the claws on another cookie sheet or pan. Repeat until all claws are coated.

6. Heat peanut oil in wok to 350 degrees to 375 degrees. Place two to three crab claws in the oil at a time, and fry until golden brown. Drain and serve immediately.

Yield: 12 to 14 claws. NOTE: The crab claws can be frozen after frying. To reheat, either fry lightly in peanut oil or warm them in a preheated 350-degree oven until they are hot. Har Hom (Basic shrimp filling)

This is a classic Cantonese filling used in various dim sum. When thoroughly blended and allowed to stand, refrigerated, for about 4 hours, it acquires an elegant and delicate taste that complements many other foods perfectly. It can be served as an hors d'oeuvre or used as first course for a meal that may, in fact, not even be Chinese. 2 pounds shrimp, shelled, deveined, washed, dried and quartered (yielding about 1 3/4 pounds) 1 3/4 teaspoons salt 2 1/2 teaspoons sugar 1/2 cup winter bamboo shoots, cut into 1/8-inch dice 4 scallions, ends discarded, washed, dried and finely sliced 1 1/2 egg whites, unbeaten 2 teaspoons oyster sauce 2 teaspoons sesame oil 2 teaspoons white wine 1/8 teaspoon white pepper.

1. In the bowl of an electric mixer, place shrimp and salt, and mix for 2 minutes at low speed. Add sugar mix for another 2 minutes. Add bamboo shoots, scallions and egg whites, and mix for 2 more minutes. Add remaining ingredients and mix for 5 minutes.

2. Place the mixture in a shallow bowl, and refrigerate for at least 4 hours. (It is much easier to stuff the dim sum when the mixure is cold.) NOTE: Basic shrimp filling can be frozen and will keep in a covered dish for one to two weeks. Yung Dau Fu (Stuffed bean curd) 1/4 basic shrimp filling recipe (see recipe) 8 cakes fresh bean curd Tapioca flour for dusting 3 to 4 tablespoons peanut oil.

1. Remove bean curd from water, place in a strainer over a bowl, and allow to drain 3 or 4 hours. Pat dry with a paper towel.

2. Cut each cake diagonally, and with a pointed knife cut out a pocket in each half of the curd.

3. Dust the pocket with tapioca flour, then fill with 1 tablespoon of the shrimp filling. Pack smoothly with a knife or with your fingers. Cooking instructions:

Stuffed bean curd may be cooked in any of the following three ways: 1. Steam 8 to 10 minutes, until shrimp turns pink in color. Serve immediately.

2. In a cast-iron frying pan, pour 2 to 3 tablespoon peanut oil. Heat over high heat until a wisp of white smoke appears. With the stuffed side of the bean curd down, pan-fry over medium heat for 6 minutes. Turn the cakes and cook each side for 2 minutes. Serve hot.

3. Deep-fat fry, two to three at a time, in peanut oil heated to 325 degrees for about 8 minutes, or until the bean curd is golden brown. Drain and serve.

Yield: 16 pieces. NOTE: Stuffed bean curd cannot be frozen, but it can be prepared a day ahead of time and refrigerated until ready to cook. Steps for Preparing Steamed Pork Buns

To prepare buns roll the kneaded steamed bun dough into a cylindrical piece, 16 inches long. Cut into 16 1-inch pieces, and roll each piece into a ball. Work with one ball at a time, keeping others covered with damp cloth.

1 Press ball of dough down lightly, then, working with fingers, press dough into a domelike shape.

2 Place 2 tablespoons of filling in inverted center of dough dome.

3 Begin to pleat dough around filling, creating a round bun.

4 Holding bun in one hand, twist off excess dough where pleats come together. Bun is complete. Place buns on squares of wax paper, place in steamer at least 2 inches apart, and steam for 15 to 20 minutes. Serve immediately.


And Back Home Again

One of the problems with American take-out food is that it is often fast food full of preservatives, fat and salt. That is, of course, why people love it. So when my husband was out of town and unable to disapprove of any unhealthy eating, I made onion rings for my daughter and her best friend Julia.They were, in a word, fabulous.

I'm totally uninterested in take-out fried chicken, but real home cooked fried chicken is another matter. If you want to have a healthier version, try Emeril's (Oven) Fried Chicken, which is actually baked in the oven. I've made chicken fingers this way for years and it's delicious.

But What About the Pizza?: Is there any more beloved or more frequently ordered take-out food than pizza? I have to confess that we have a fabulous mom and pop Italian restaurant a few blocks from us and sometimes I order pizza from them rather than making it myself because it is just so delicious. Even so, making pizza yourself is quite easy, and also delicious. If you like, try some really easy Individual Flat Bread Pizzas on your grill.

So there you have it: A bit of an overview of some wonderful and delicious recipes for take-out food that you can make in your own home. Here's all the recipes we have here, for easy clicking:


Chinese Stuffed Peppers: Recipe Instructions

Use a cleaver or knife to finely mince the shrimp into a very fine paste. This process entails chopping and folding the shrimp paste over and onto itself, and continuing to chop. Transfer the shrimp paste to a bowl.

Chop the scallions. Set aside half of the green portion for the sauce. Add the rest of the chopped scallions to the shrimp, along with 1 teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil, 1 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch, 2 teaspoons Shaoxing wine, and white pepper to taste.

Use a fork to beat/whip the shrimp until it is smooth and all the ingredients are well-combined.

Pop the stems off the bell peppers and follow the lines of each pepper to cut into 3-5 segments. Remove the seeds. If using long hot green peppers, just cut them in half lengthwise and remove the seeds.

Stuff each pepper segment with the shrimp mixture until the filling is even with the edges of the peppers. You can also trim the ends of the peppers to ensure they are flush and at the same level of the filling. This will make the stuffed peppers easier to cook.

Heat a tablespoon of oil in a wok or skillet over medium high heat and place the peppers in the oil, stuffing side down. Cook until they are browned, about 2 minutes. Turn your Chinese stuffed peppers over to sear the bottoms for another 2 minutes, turning the heat down if they start to get too dark. If using the long hot green peppers or another variety of thin-fleshed pepper, simply transfer them to the serving plate.

If using bell peppers, which have thicker flesh and take longer to cook, add 2 tablespoons of water to the pan, cover, and steam for another 2 minutes, or until the peppers are just tender. Set aside on a serving plate.

It’s time to make the sauce, which only takes a couple minutes. Heat the wok over medium heat and add the oil, garlic and fermented Black Beans. Stir-fry for a few seconds and add the Shaoxing wine.

When the wine is bubbly, add the rest of the sauce ingredients (except the cornstarch slurry) and bring to a simmer. Once simmering, add the cornstarch slurry gradually until the sauce is thick enough to coat a spoon. Stir in the reserved scallions and spoon the sauce over the Chinese stuffed peppers.

Serve these Chinese stuffed peppers dim sum style or with rice as a meal!

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Vegetable Dim Sum Recipe / Easy Steamed Vegetable Dumplings Recipe Tablespoon Com

Vegetable Dim Sum Recipe / Easy Steamed Vegetable Dumplings Recipe Tablespoon Com. Veg momos or veg dim sum is the most common and popular street food in delhi. Cabbage finely chopped ¼ medium. Since dim sum tends to be a fat laden meal, i often try to make these treats a bit healthier when creating them at home. Vegetable dim sum recipe with english subtitles. Ingredients for vegetable dimsum recipe. Browse our dim sum recipes for many of your favorite dishes! Plan on 6 to 10 pieces per person •. Watch how to make vegetable dim sum! Shrimp dim sum recipe, dim sum recipes chicken, dim sum dough recipe, prawn dim sum recipe, how to make dim sum dumplings.

Shrimp dim sum recipe, dim sum recipes chicken, dim sum dough recipe, prawn dim sum recipe, how to make dim sum dumplings. Veg momos recipe | steamed vegetable momos | vegetable dim sum by our grandpa. How to make vegetable dim sum. Momos are made with sauteed vegetables stuffed in a potli shaped steamed dumplings. Serve it hot with some spicy chilli chutney and you are in heaven.

Veg Momos Recipe With Momo Chutney Dim Sum A Happy Treat from i0.wp.com 2 cups whole wheat flour. For english subtitles, click the captions button in the right corner of the video (2nd button from left, next to the. Have a look at the recipe. When i finally get around to covering even more. Veg momos recipe | steamed vegetable momos | vegetable dim sum by our grandpa.

Veg momos recipe | steamed vegetable momos | vegetable dim sum by our grandpa.

Spring rolls smaller and lighter than egg rolls, spring rolls are filled with sautéed vegetables and fried until crispy. Assortment of dumplings and dim sum offerings (see 'dim sum 101', below) Plan on 6 to 10 pieces per person •. Cabbage finely chopped ¼ medium. Dim sum is a chinese meal of small dishes, shared with hot tea, usually around brunch time. This vegetable dim sum recipe is excellent and find more great recipes, tried & tested recipes from ndtv food. Vegetable dim sum recipe with english subtitles. I figure that you can get the i'm happy to say that i've been able to avoid deep fat frying in my dim sum recipes up to this point. Dim sum shrimp dumplings (har gow/ha cao). For english subtitles, click the captions button in the right corner of the video (2nd button from left, next to the.

Browse our dim sum recipes for many of your favorite dishes! Vegetable dim sum recipe with english subtitles. This vegan dim sum dumplings recipe requires some time and finger skills, but in the end, it's worth it for these delicious dumplings! Dim sum shrimp dumplings (har gow/ha cao). Dim sums are like momos or dumplings in shape and procedure.

Veg Momos Recipe Vegetable Momos Recipe Vegetable Dim Sum Recipe Crunchy Kitchen from www.crunchykitchen.com Steamed buns also called bao (pronounced. Plan on 6 to 10 pieces per person •. Veg momos recipe is ready to enjoy with momos chutney. Asian recipes vegetarian recipes cuisine veggie pancakes veggies recipes vegan recipes dim sum recipes food. How to make oats chinese vegetable dim sum. Learn how to make steamed veg momos | vegetable dim sum recipe with spicy hot momos chutney recipe.

Though i'm not a big fan of momos, i love the steamed version of it.

2 cups whole wheat flour. I know it's a difficult time for all of us as the world virtually holds its breath. Luxury serving vegetarian dim sum dimsum or momos isolated. Dim sums are like momos or dumplings in shape and procedure. Browse our dim sum recipes for many of your favorite dishes! I figure that you can get the i'm happy to say that i've been able to avoid deep fat frying in my dim sum recipes up to this point. Plan on 6 to 10 pieces per person •. When i finally get around to covering even more. By praveen kumar april 27, 2008. This dim sum is typically served with tea. How to make vegetable dim sum. Learn how to make steamed veg momos | vegetable dim sum recipe with spicy hot momos chutney recipe. A delicious steamed dish / snack originated in tibet.

Gizzi's mixed dim sum and chinese vegetables. Serve it hot with some spicy chilli chutney and you are in heaven. Yesterday i posted a simple vegetable dim sum recipe that is our family favorite. Dim sum is a chinese meal of small dishes, shared with hot tea, usually around brunch time. 6 diy vegan dim sum recipes to drool over vegnews. It began in small roadside teahouses, which served simple snacks and hot tea to travelers making their way along the legendary silk road. Luxury serving vegetarian dim sum dimsum or momos isolated.

Momos Veg Veg Dumplings Dim Sum Recipe Abc Recipes from abcrecipesbook.com Veg momos or veg dim sum is the most common and popular street food in delhi. I know it's a difficult time for all of us as the world virtually holds its breath. Veg momos recipe is ready to enjoy with momos chutney. You can find all sort of dim sum recipes, such as from rice, steam bun, wheat dumplings and they can be filled with dim sum is often filled with a mixture of meat and vegetables. A delicious steamed dish / snack originated in tibet. I figure that you can get the i'm happy to say that i've been able to avoid deep fat frying in my dim sum recipes up to this point. Watch how to make vegetable dim sum! Super delicious and my all time favourite momos recipes. 6 diy vegan dim sum recipes to drool over vegnews. Over centuries, dim sum transformed into the loud.

However, we use rice flour to make dim sums in place of maida.

Add the flour into a large mixing bowl, add a little water at a time and knead to make a smooth dough. Dim sums are like momos or dumplings in shape and procedure. Dim sum shrimp dumplings (har gow/ha cao). The dim sum dishes that we all love are believed to originate in guangzhou and afterward spread to hong kong. Momos recipe made from scratch. How to make vegetable dim sum. Dim sum, a distinctly active and fun style of chinese dining, is a cantonese tradition. For people who have been to city of ten thousand buddhas in mendocino, california would know about the vegan restaurant… Browse our dim sum recipes for many of your favorite dishes! By praveen kumar april 27, 2008. It began in small roadside teahouses, which served simple snacks and hot tea to travelers making their way along the legendary silk road.

For english subtitles, click the captions button in the right corner of the video (2nd button from left, next to the.

Cabbage finely chopped ¼ medium.

6 diy vegan dim sum recipes to drool over vegnews.

Today, is yet another steamed asian dish that is also a favorite in the family.

Spring rolls smaller and lighter than egg rolls, spring rolls are filled with sautéed vegetables and fried until crispy.

Vegetable dumplings are a great way to eat some dim the 15 fat burning meals cookbook features our favorite recipes that you can use to get closer to your.

Dim sum is a cantonese cuisine that features a huge variety of dumplings and exciting dishes that 12.

This dim sum is typically served with tea.

Have a look at the recipe.

Ingredients for vegetable dimsum recipe.

Over centuries, dim sum transformed into the loud.

Asian recipes vegetarian recipes cuisine veggie pancakes veggies recipes vegan recipes dim sum recipes food.

Dim sum is a chinese meal of small dishes, shared with hot tea, usually around brunch time.

Veg momos or veg dim sum is the most common and popular street food in delhi.

Though i'm not a big fan of momos, i love the steamed version of it.

Veg momos recipe is ready to enjoy with momos chutney.

Spring rolls smaller and lighter than egg rolls, spring rolls are filled with sautéed vegetables and fried until crispy.

Yesterday i posted a simple vegetable dim sum recipe that is our family favorite.

However, we use rice flour to make dim sums in place of maida.

However, we use rice flour to make dim sums in place of maida.

The vegetable dim sum is chinese cuisine and goes very well as an appetizer.

Dim sum, a distinctly active and fun style of chinese dining, is a cantonese tradition.

Over centuries, dim sum transformed into the loud.

Browse our dim sum recipes for many of your favorite dishes!

Vegetable dim sum recipe with english subtitles.

Vegan dim sum truck plows into popular east austin coffee.

Shrimp dim sum recipe, dim sum recipes chicken, dim sum dough recipe, prawn dim sum recipe, how to make dim sum dumplings.

• for more recipes related to vegetable dimsum checkout dry vegetable manchurian, sichuan pakoda, cabbage jowar muthias, cabbage wrapped dim sums.

I hope you will try it at home.

I figure that you can get the i'm happy to say that i've been able to avoid deep fat frying in my dim sum recipes up to this point.